Steel

No quick judgment for Uli Hoeneß

Summary

Munich (dpa) – Tax evader Uli Hoeneß is even more distressed after his spectacular million-dollar confession. According to a tax investigator from Rosenheim, the president of FC Bayern Munich submitted a file on his secret account in Switzerland that was […]

No quick judgment for Uli Hoeneß.  The sums in the Hoeneß case are getting higher and higher.

Munich (dpa) – Tax evader Uli Hoeneß is even more distressed after his spectacular million-dollar confession.

According to a tax investigator from Rosenheim, the president of FC Bayern Munich submitted a file on his secret account in Switzerland that was created over a year ago just before the trial. Judge Rupert Heindl’s ruling on March 13th is unlikely to happen quickly before the Munich district court.

“It is no longer very likely that it will be like that,” said court spokeswoman Andrea Titz and emphasized: “It can be assumed that further appointments will be required.” An auditor has been summoned as an additional witness for Wednesday. According to Titz, it is to be expected that in addition to the five witnesses who were then heard, more could be named. At the start of the procedure, which was initially scheduled for four days, the 62-year-old Hoeneß had admitted that he had evaded a total of 18.5 million euros in taxes, which was 15 million more than assumed.

The tax investigator entered room 134 in the Munich Palace of Justice with a red laundry basket full of files. About a week ago, Hoeneß’s defense sent the authorities a USB stick with information about his Swiss account, she reported. The official noted that the “basic files” of the PDF documents were created on January 18, 2013, one day after the Bayern president reported himself to himself. That was determined by the IT department of the tax authorities. “So far, it has always been said that the bank was not able to do this at all,” explained Titz.

The defense emphasized that the file had gradually been completed and was only completed shortly before the start of the trial. According to the tax investigator, the authorities gave Hoeneß and his advisors the opportunity to improve the voluntary disclosure. Only then did they initiate an investigation and in March 2013 they searched the private property of Hoeneß on the Tegernsee. The Bayern boss then called the tax office and thanked him for the “discreet execution of the search”, the officer reported. A month later, the voluntary disclosure was made public through a media report.

Hoeneß appeared again on the second day of the trial in a black suit and accompanied by his wife Susi in court. But he looked more serious than the day before. Judge Heindl spoke of the 70,000-page documents as a “big shoebox with data”. Whether the short period of time was sufficient for the tax authorities to sift through them completely and to be able to quantify the tax liability will only become apparent when the tax investigator is questioned further.

With the admission that they had withheld a total of 18.5 million euros in taxes from the tax authorities, Hoeneß and his lawyers had surprised the public prosecutor at the beginning of the trial. This had accused the 62-year-old in their indictment of having evaded 3.5 million euros in taxes.

In the opinion of tax union boss Thomas Eigenhaler, there is no way around a prison sentence for Hoeneß. “A prison sentence is absolutely imperative for me,” he told Bayerischer Rundfunk. “I have very, very strong doubts whether she can still be suspended on parole.”

The lawyer and FDP politician Wolfgang Kubicki also does not believe in a suspended sentence. “The figure alone, 18 million euros, is so serious that I currently lack the belief that he can receive a suspended sentence,” said the deputy party chairman of the FDP on Monday on Deutschlandfunk.

The board of directors of FC Bayern München AG, made up of German business leaders, is reluctant to comment on the future of Chairman Hoeneß. The process is still ongoing, said Audi boss Rupert Stadler at the carmaker’s press conference on Tuesday in Ingolstadt. A “final decision” is required, explained Stadler. In addition to the sporting goods manufacturer Adidas and the insurance group Allianz, Audi is an investor in FC Bayern. In addition to Stadler, VW boss Martin Winterkorn also sits on the supervisory board.